Founded in 1972, the Department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies fosters the interdisciplinary study of women, gender, and sexuality, through a rich multicultural and internationally informed academic environment. Our Program seeks to produce intellectually rigorous, analytical and creative work that embodies the perspective of gender in its local and global dimensions through teaching, research, and outreach activities.

KU Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department is growing strong Spring 2015 with 55 WGSS Majors, 35 Human Sexuality Minors, 25 WGSS Minors, 25 Graduate Certificate students and 10 students in our PhD Program! Thanks to all for a great semester at KU!


Monday, March 30th, 6-8:00pm, Rm 100, Stauffer-Flint Hall, KU Film on anti-homosexuality sentiment in Uganda tonight! The Kansas African Studies Center is hosting a screening of God Loves Uganda on Monday, March 30th. The 1.5 hour film will be shown from 6:00-8:00 in Stauffer-Flint Hall Room 100, followed by a discussion with Dr. Okaka Dokotum, Fulbright visiting scholar from Kyambogo University, Uganda. This film is an exploration of the role of the American evangelical movement in feeding anti-homosexuality legislation in Uganda. It prominently features one particular church located in our own backyard – IHOP in Kansas City. Elizabeth MacGonagle Associate Professor of African History History/African & African American Studies Director, Kansas African Studies Center (KASC)
WGSS February Sisters Speaker Sarah Deer, Feb. 12th, Woodruff Auditorium. 3-4:30, #wgss .ku.edu
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times